The Combination of Simplicity and Complex Behavior Is An Overlooked Advantage

People have a problem when it comes to putting numbers to things. In physics, the standard way of breaking up a problem involves spectral analysis. To break up turbulence, a set of waves, at a given scale, interact with other waves. The trouble you'll run into is the fact that because the problem is non-linear, …

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MWI, “Chris”, Quantum Suicide, Thought Experiment, Wave Functions and “Desmondian Mathematics”

Things that seem difficult to do have easy math--and things that seem extremely easy to do are often accompanied by the most strenuous math. Let's take the universe as an example. If you were to make a key assumption, that the equations for the entire universe are "easy" to do, however, you must realize that …

Gravity (No, Not The Box Office Snoozefest)

In the real world, no one knows exactly what the "true model" of gravity is but physicists are aware that in most situations it [gravity] is reminiscent of Newtonian gravity, and, under every situation that has been measured, gravity resembles general relativity. Let's say, you don't agree with that observation--do know that I don't care …

While You Keep It All Random, I’m Rollin’ The Dice of Determinism, Playa…

Have you ever heard of the term, "random number"? What exactly is a "random number"? Can 6 be a "random number"? Is there some sort of an "order" to these "random numbers"? By "order", I'm referring to the relation by which 4 is < (less than) 5. Don't confuse that with magnitude, which is the …

Thermodynamic Quantities: Defining Observations

In my hand, I have a can of Coke that is 16 fluid ounces in one coordinate system and 473.18 mL in another. Is that scalar or not? Answer: No. This is where the need to define observation comes to face (nh). One thing about fluid measurement is that it doesn't correspond to any quantum …

The Watson “i/j” Theory Part 1: Purpose of Theory, Implied Values of Diacritic Dots and Predictions

**DISCLAIMER: I haven't been blogging much, especially last month (April) since I spent the entire month working with a trial version of MATLAB. But anyways, in this blog post I'll be introducing an unorthodox approach to a mathematical theory that I've been working on for the past ten years. It's based on the values of …

Your Honor….What’s The Charge?

According to the way Heisenberg did it, in quantum mechanics, both the position and the momentum come out as probabilities whenever you perform a measurement. The math states that these two probability distributions are Fourier Transforms of each other. Oddly enough, there is a theorem of the Fourier Transforms [of each other] that says the …

I Hope I’m Being Coherent And A Little Less Incoherent About Decoherence, Playa…

First of all, I would like to point out that both randomness and determinism, in the effect of decoherence, are both attributes of theory that are, as a result, developed. Decoherence irreversibly converts quantum behavior (additive probability amplitudes) to more classical behavior (additive probabilities), however, this requires noticing the role of the physicist in the …

The Menagerie of Charge Particles

According to the Gauss law, physical states must be charge-neutral. The Gauss law must not be interpreted as an operator equation seeing how it would directly violate the operator algebra / commutation relations. Therefore, it is translated into a constraint equation for the physical sector of the theory: $latex G (x) = \nabla E (x) …

Is The Wavelength The “Size” of The Photon Particle?

The wavelength of a photon particle is perfectly well-defined but only when it's in a momentum eigenstate (i.e., when it has perfectly well-defined momentum--and energy). However, this never happens since a photon is always in a superposition of momentum eigenstates: $latex \lvert\alpha\rangle=\int{d^3p}\ f(\mathbf{p}) \lvert \mathbf{p}\rangle &s=2$ Perhaps, the quantity that we might want to consider …